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Equation

  • Flyz
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Flyz created the topic: Equation

Hi guys

I'm just looking at some formulas, it may seem simple but it has me stuck so I need help
Ok

L= CL1/2pV2S

I understand the abbreviations (lift) ect but what I don't get is do I add All the CL1/2pV2S together to get a certain number for lift or is it just saying that
L contains all of the abbreviations

Hope this makes sense to someone :unsure:
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bobtait replied the topic: Equation

Actually the main purpose of the lift formula is to state clearly all of the factors that affect lift. Basically, CL (angle of attack), p (air density), V (true airspeed) and S (wing area). It was never intended that you use the formula to calculate an actual value for the amount of lift being produced at any given time. It is true that, providing the correct units are used, the terms in the formula are multiplied together to allow engineers to calculate an actual value for lift. However, that will never be required of a candidate in a CASA exam.
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  • Flyz
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Flyz replied the topic: Equation

Thanks Bob

I think that what was confusing me,

Thanks
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  • John.Heddles
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  • ATPL/consulting aero engineer
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John.Heddles replied the topic: Equation

Just a sideline point to keep in mind.

The standard formula used for basic pilot training (as below) is a simplification for low speed and low altitude. Two other parameters which should be included (but aren't because they aren't significant for low speed, low altitude flight) are Mach Number and Reynolds Number. Should you progress to jet operations, these certainly come into play and have significant effects.

Engineering specialist in aircraft performance and weight control.
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