Header1200x385

facebook_page_plugin
× Welcome to the CPL Air Law question and answer forum. Please feel free to post your questions but more importantly also suggest answers for your forum colleagues. Bob himself or one of the other tutors will get to your question as soon as we can.

CPL Programmed Learning Exercise - Answers

  • Posts: 20
  • Thank you received: 0

dontgiveup created the topic: CPL Programmed Learning Exercise - Answers

Hi all,

I am struggling with CPL Air Law so much that I am not sure if my answers to the questions in the programmed learning exercise are right, even after reading the text (and I can't even come up with answers to quite a few questions)...
I wonder if anyone has got the answers so that I can check against mine, and quickly see where the knowledge gaps are.

I have very little time left and am feeling desperate. I feel like I know the basics but may have misinterpret some info and need the answers as pointers to close the gap. Thanks a lot!
#1

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 2447
  • Thank you received: 257

bobtait replied the topic: CPL Programmed Learning Exercise - Answers

The programmed learning exercises were designed to encourage candidates to review the text to find the answers to the questions in the previous chapter. The answers to the programmed learning questions are all findable in the associated chapter. The exam will occasionally require you to turn to the documents to find answers. Page 87 and page 109 of the book gives the answers to some of the more difficult questions in the chapter.
#2

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 20
  • Thank you received: 0

dontgiveup replied the topic: CPL Programmed Learning Exercise - Answers

Thank a lot for the reply, Bob.
Please understand that I am posting this question only after I have tried my very best in attempting to find the answers in the book. Perhaps because English is not my first language, I struggle with Air Law so much. As the exam date is approaching, having readily available correct answers would help a tonne in speeding up my studies amidst all the challenges...

I will post my answers here and see if anyone can correct me for the wrong ones and provide answers for the ones I don’t know. I will start with the chapter that I most urgently need help with (Chapter 6). Answers that I am not sure about are marked with “???”. To avoid copyright issues, I have only included the answers here, but not the questions.

[Note: for the reference in the parenthesis, I wrote down the title of the section in the book instead of page numbers, in case people have different versions of the book]


Chapter 6 - Flight Planning

- 10 (ref: Flights away from the vicinity of a departure aerodrome or over water)
- 10nm; 60min (ref: Meteorological briefing requirements for day VFR flight; A flight may commence without a weather forecast)
1. Aerodrome forecast/ ICAO landing forecast for departure aerodrome???
2. Aerodrome forecast/ ICAO landing forecast for planned destination aerodrome???
3. Aerodrome forecast/ ICAO landing forecast for planned alternate aerodrome???
(ref: Meteorological briefing requirements for day VFR flight)

- 30 minutes; 60 minutes (ref: Meteorological briefing requirements for day VFR flight)
- 5 nm (ref: ???); 3 hours; 18 hours??? (ref: TAF3 - The 3 hour TAF)
- 1 hour???
- 60 minutes; 30 minutes??? (ref: A flight may commence without a weather forecast)

Different type of NOTAMs available are:
1. Head Office NOTAM
2. FIR NOTAM
3. Location NOTAM
(ref: Notices to Airmen, NOTAM and facility briefing requirements for day VFR flight)

Domestic Flight Notification; Flight Note
(ref: Flight Notification Forms)

- SARTIME; controlled airspace; 30
(ref: How to submit a flight notification for aircraft operating by day under VFR)
- telephone
(ref: Nominating a SARTIME)

Day VFR en route minima for flight at 4500ft is:
1. 5000m visibility
2. 600m horizontal separation from cloud
3. 100ft vertical above cloud, 500ft vertical below cloud
(ref: Day VFR enroute minima; Part 91 MOS, Section 2.07)

Day VFR destination minima are:
1. Cloud – a total of more than 4/8 below 1500ft AGL
2. Visibility – less than 8km or forecast probability of less than 8km; equal or more than 8km but with a forecast of at least 30% probability of fog, mist, dust or any other phenomenon restricting visibility to less than 8km
3. At least a 30% probability of a thunderstorm or associated severe turbulence
(ref: The day VFR destination minima are:)

- PROB???
- 45min fixed reserve???; 5% trip fuel???; ???minutes (ref: Part 91 MOS, Table 19.02 (2))
- 30 minutes??? (ref: Part 91 MOS, Table 19.02 (2))


- TAF3; TAF??? (ref:???)
- 30; alternate (ref: When INTER is used in a TAF)
- 60; alternate (ref: When TEMPO is used in a TAF)

1. be suitable as a destination for the flight
2. Not itself be an alternate for which an alternate is required.
(ref: Planning an Alternate)

1. ceiling 1500ft
2. visibility 8km
3. ???
(ref: AIP ENR .1.1-75)



Chapter 1 - Australian Air Law Overview

- Air transport??? (ref: Privileges and Limitation of a Private Pilot Licence, What is a private operation?)
- Pilot licence; current class 1 or class 2 medical certificate, or a medical exemption; current government document issued within 10 years and contains a photograph of the licence holder (ref: Pilot Privileges and Limitations)

- evenly divided (ref: not in the book but in CASR Volume 5, Dictionary Part 1 – Definitions. See “cost-sharing”)
- private (ref: ???); 6 (ref: not in the book but in CASR Volume 5, Dictionary Part 1 – Definitions. See “cost-sharing”)

- cannot
- cannot; 5700
- can (if it is not a regular public transport operation)???
- can (as long as they are not the pilot in command)???
(ref: Privileges and limitations of commercial pilot)

- passenger transport operation; cargo transport operation; medical transport operation???
(ref: Explanation – What do the words ‘any operation’ mean in Reg 61.570)

- cannot???
- design feature??? Gas turbine??? (ref: Design feature endorsement)
- instrument??? (ref: Operational ratings)



Chapter 2 is rather straight forward so I will skip it for the time being.



Chapter 3 - Navigation (some of the answers have been explained in the book at the end of the exercise)

- 10,000 feet; FL 115 (ref: figure under Altimetry in Australian Airspace, Flight below 10000 - Altitudes)
- that it could glide in case of engine failure (ref: Flights Over Water)
- ???
- ???

- 10nm
1. Meteorological reports and forecasts for the route to be followed and at the aerodromes to be used;
2. Availability and serviceability of enroute airways facilities;
3. Condition and suitability of aerodromes to be used;
4. Weather conditions at destination and alternate aerodromes;
5. ATC rules and procedures applicable to the route;
6. Relevant NOTAMS
(ref: Basic Flight Planning Requirements)

- altitude; elevation (ref: Altimetry in Australian Airspace)
- elevation; value (ref: Altimetry in Australian Airspace)
- 10,000 (ref: figure under Altimetry in Australian Airspace)
- Yes (because for QNH above 1013hPa, FL110 or above is available) (ref: figure under Altimetry in Australian Airspace)
1. area QNH (ref: Altimetry in Australian Airspace, Flight below 10000 - Altitudes)
2. ditto
3. 1013 mb (ref: Altimetry in Australian Airspace, Flight below 10000 – Flight Levels)
4. ditto
5. ditto
6. area or local QNH (ref: Altimetry in Australian Airspace, Climbing or descending through the transition layer)
7. ditto
8. ditto

- Yes (When “should” is mentioned instead of “shall”, it is a recommended practice but not a standard, so it is not a must to comply. The book says one should cruise at an altitude on even thousands + 500ft for westerly track, unless in controlled airspace with assigned non-specific cruising level; or outside controlled airspace and below 3000ft AMSL/ and above 3000ft AMSL but below 1500ft AGL; or when it is not practicable)
(ref: Selection of Specified VFR Cruising Level)

- Yes (because it is a non-specific cruising level assigned by ATC)
(ref: Selection of Specified VFR Cruising Level)

- 1 (ref: Navigation Requirements, Navigating by visual reference to ground or water)
- 200 (ref: Navigation Requirements, Navigating by visual reference to ground or water)
- 30 (ref: Navigation Requirements, Navigating by visual reference to ground or water)
- 30??? (ref: not in the book but in AIP ENR 1.1-25, para 4.2.1d(2) and 4.2.1b)
- No, because it is not the intersection of two or more position lines that intersect with angles not less than 45 degrees that are obtained from NDBs, VORs, localisers or DMEs in any combination
(ref: Navigating by reference to radio navigation aids)

1. If in VMC, remain in VMC
2. Maintain terrain clearance visually
3. Squawk code 7600
4. Broadcast intentions on the assumption that your aircraft has not suffered transmission failure
5. Land at the nearest suitable aerodrome
6. Notify ATS of your arrival
(ref: If operating outside controlled airspace when failure occurs)

- 3??? (ref: If operating to an airways clearance when failure occurs and:)
- 2; watch for a light signal while in circuit??? (ref: If operating to an airways clearance when failure occurs and:)
- 121.5; 243 (ref: Urgency and Distress Messages)

1. MAYDAY, MAYDAY, MAYDAY
2. Aircraft callsign spoken 3 types
3. Nature of distressed condition
4. Intention of pilot in command
5. Present position, level and heading
6. Any other relevant information
(ref: Urgency and Distress Messages, The format of a distress message is:)




Chapter 4 - Rules of the Air and General Operating Rules

- Pilot in command??? (ref: Fundamental responsibility of pilot)
- Pilots (ref: Fundamental responsibility of pilot)
- Operating so close to another aircraft to create a collision hazard; operating on the ground to create a hazard to itself or another aircraft (ref: Fundamental responsibility of pilot)
- Right (ref: Fundamental responsibility of pilot)
- Yes (ref: Fundamental responsibility of pilot)
- Power driven aircraft towing a banner (ref: N/A???)
- Right (ref: Fundamental responsibility of pilot)
- Myself (ref: Fundamental responsibility of pilot)
- Aircraft on base (ref: Operating at uncontrolled aerodromes – other operational matters)
- [See answer in the book following this exercise]
- 10 (ref: Basic operating procedures in the vicinity of uncontrolled aerodromes)
- [See answer in the book following this exercise]
- 500 ft AGL (The question should say “maintain runway track” instead of “maintain runway heading”?) (ref: Operating procedures at uncontrolled aerodromes – take-off requirements)
- Left (ref: Operating at uncontrolled aerodromes – in the circuit pattern)
- Yes, if it has become inoperative during flight, or the purpose of the flight is to take the radio to a place where it can be repaired. In this case, the anti-collision lights, landing lights and transponder should be switched on. The aircraft should join crosswind or downwind. Otherwise, the flight is to be conducted by day in VMC, and in the company with another aircraft with an operative radio, and the pilot in command of the other aircraft is authorized to operate the radio.
(ref: Unserviceable radio procedures at uncontrolled aerodromes)


1. For terrain clearance???
2. When there is no conflict with other traffic???
3. When the tailwind component is within aircraft tolerance specified by the manufacturer???

1. the pilot determines the wind direction before starting the approach
2. the pilot determines the runway in use before starting the approach
3. All required radio transmissions are made
4. The aircraft gives way to other aircraft in the circuit
5. The aircraft is established on final approach at least 3nm from the runway threshold
(ref: Operating at uncontrolled aerodromes – other operational matters)

1. taking-off/ landing/ missed approach/ practising emergency procedure in the absence of passengers/ performing training circuits at an aerodrome
2. Performing an air display in accordance with an approval provided by CASA
(ref: Flying over populated areas or public gatherings)

1000 (ref: Flying over populated areas or public gatherings)
500 (ref: Flying over other areas)
1. determining the suitability of an aerodrome for landing/ forced landing/ reasons mentioned above
2. low-flying activity over an area for which the owner has provided permission to carry out such training or activity
(ref: Flying over other areas)

Unserviceable
Unserviceable
Use hard surfaces only
150; 330
(ref: Runway Fixed Distance and Touchdown Zone Markings)


Flashing green; authorised to taxi
Steady green; authorised to take-off
Return to the starting point on aerodrome
(Air Traffic Control Light Signals)





Chapter 5 - Air Space and Communication

- are not (ref: Class A airspace)
- E, G (ref: Class E airspace; Class G airspace)
- E, G (ref: Class E airspace; Class G airspace)
- 4500(ref: Class D airspace)
- is (ref: In Class D airspace)
- A (ref: Class A airspace)
- yes (ref: Summary of Airspace Requirements for VFR Flights)
- 5 (ref: Air Traffic Clearances, ‘make visual approach’)

1. ATC route clearance
2. SSR codes/ data link logon codes
3. altimeter setting, radio, or radionavigation frequency
4. route and holding point in a taxi clearance
5. clearance/ conditional clearance/ instructions to hold short of, enter, land on, line up on, wait, take off from, cross, taxi or backtrack on any runway
6. level assignments or instructions
7. direction of turn
8. heading and speed instructions
9. enroute holding instructions
10. approach clearance
11. assigned runway

- Yes, because acknowledgement of radio contact by ATC may be taken as an airways clearance to enter Class D airspace and operate as planned. (ref: There are four key points to note when operating in Class D airspace)

- No, because flights within danger areas do not require clearance. (ref: Prohibited, Restricted and Danger Areas)

- 7600 (ref: Use of Transponders)
- 7700 (ref: Use of Transponders)

1. maintaining a steady outbound track;
2. within 10nm of departure point; performing published approach, holding or recovery procedures; flights conducted in accordance with special procedures arranged with area air defence commander
(ref: Air Defence Identification Zone)

- 2500 ft (ref: There are four key points to note when operating in Class D airspace)
- 5000 (ref: There are four key points to note when operating in Class D airspace)
- clear of cloud; 1600 (ref: There are four key points to note when operating in Class D airspace)
- 1 (ref: ???)

1. Aircraft callsign
2. Aircraft type
3. Present position
4. Present level
5. Receipt of ATIS code
6. Intentions
(ref: Airway Clearances)

Standard dead side entry (ref: Figure 5.13 under Operations at Non-Controlled Aerodromes, Joining the Circuit):
Overfly from dead side to join ‘mid-field crosswind’. Stay above circuit height as the aircraft tracks along the downwind and base legs, between the legs and the runway. Overshoot the runway before turning final, stay above circuit height until the aircraft is on the dead side again, then descend to circuit height of 1,000 ft. Turn to join mid-field downwind.

Radio calls for backtracking then departing on a right turn (assume callsign of aircraft is ABC):
- “Innisfail Traffic, Cessna 172, ABC, entering and backtracking Runway 14 to XXX, Innisfail”??? (ref: Gen 3.4-65)
- “Innisfail Traffic, Cessna 172, ABC, lining up and rolling Runway 14 for XXX departure, Innisfail”??? (ref: Figure 5.16 under Operations at Non-Controlled Aerodromes, Departure and landing separation)
- “Innisfail Traffic, Cessna 172, ABC, departing Innisfail Runway 14, passing 1400 climbing to 3500 to track East, Innisfail”???

Straight-in approach actions and radio calls:
1. the pilot determines the wind direction before starting the approach
2. the pilot determines the runway in use before starting the approach
3. All required radio transmissions are made as follows:
- “Innisfail Traffic, Cessna 172, ABC, 10 miles Northwest inbound, straight-in approach, Runway 14, Innisfail”
- “Innisfail Traffic, Cessna 172, ABC, 3 miles final, Runway 14, Innisfail”
- “Innisfail Traffic, Cessna 172, ABC, vacated all active runways, Innisfail”
(ref: Figure 5.18 under Operations at Non-Controlled Aerodrome)
4. The aircraft gives way to other aircraft in the circuit
5. The aircraft is established on final approach at least 3nm from the runway threshold
(ref: Chapter 4, Operating at uncontrolled aerodromes – other operational matters)

Slower aircraft turn final and in conflict:
If there is no other conflicting traffic, climb with Vx to 2,000 ft (this is to leave more separation in case that aircraft needs airspace to conduct missed approach subsequently), then go to the dead side of the circuit and join the circuit again. ???
If there is other conflicting traffic above or joining the mid-field downwind from the dead side, adjust the said height to be climbed to according to aircraft performance.

Number two for departure, 4 conditions (???):
1. the preceding aircraft has either crossed the upwind end of the runway, or commenced a turn, or become airborne and is at least 1800m ahead if the runway is longer than 1800m, or the preceding aircraft is airborne and is at least 600m ahead if both aircraft have MTOW below 2,000 kg.
2. preceding landing aircraft using the same runway has vacated it and is taxiing away from the runway
3. a preceding aircraft using another runway has crossed or stopped short of the take-off aircraft’s runway.
4. appropriate radio calls are made??? (ref: ???)
(ref: AIP ENR 1.1-56, 9.3.1)
#3

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 2447
  • Thank you received: 257

bobtait replied the topic: CPL Programmed Learning Exercise - Answers

I've forwarded your post to our Air Law specialist, Bob Hamilton. Unfortunately he is away at the moment but you can expect a reply in a couple of days. Thank you for your feedback. In the meantime, if you check out the other multiple choice questions in the book and our on-line practice exams, you should be well prepared. Those questions cover the areas you can expect in the CASA exam.
#4
The following user(s) said Thank You: dontgiveup

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 2447
  • Thank you received: 257

bobtait replied the topic: CPL Programmed Learning Exercise - Answers

Sorry for the delay in responding to your request concerning the programmed learning exercises. Bob Hamilton is still away and we expect him back in a few days. Since he wrote the exercises it would be appropriate for him to reply to your request.
#5
The following user(s) said Thank You: dontgiveup

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 20
  • Thank you received: 0

dontgiveup replied the topic: CPL Programmed Learning Exercise - Answers

Just passed my CPL Air Law written exams today (scored 95%) and got some tips to share.

Tip 1:
Forget about the answers to the learning exercise (during my revision, I realised some of the answers I posted were wrong anyways), just highlight in your permitted materials all the things mentioned in the Bob Tait book and review it the night before the exam. Quite a number of questions that I got were pretty straight forward. They can be found in the materials word-for-word.

Tip 2:
If you have forgotten which permitted material contains the answer, try flipping through the ones that you haven't yet used. The exam questions are supposedly distributed in a manner such that a certain number of questions from each set of material appears in your exam.

Tip 3:
Try to avoid the traps in the question. E.g. In the multiple choice answer, they could be copying a random statement from CAO 48.1 Instrument 2019, which is correct, but the question is actually asking you another thing, say, maximum FDP.

I literally thought I would fail, but Tip 1 saved my life. Hope this helps!
#6

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

  • Posts: 2447
  • Thank you received: 257

bobtait replied the topic: CPL Programmed Learning Exercise - Answers

That's really great news. It appears that "dontgiveup" is a very appropriate forum name for you! Congratulations on an excellent result - especially for home study. All the best for your future career in aviation.

Bob
#7

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.132 seconds